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Electrical Infrastructure in Canada: What’s Up Next?

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New Blog Post: What’s Next for Electrical Infrastructure in Canada?

As the world changes, Canada changes with it. The slow move away from fossil fuels is in progress, and this provides us the opportunity to take a look at where Canada is moving as well. As the economy works around energy generation it’s important to have a firm grasp on where things are going and also where they are coming from.

We thought it would be an enlightening topic of discussion to take a look our own electrical infrastructure and see where things are headed.


Electrical Energy Generation in Canada

Canada is quite diverse in its energy generation, being the second largest producer of hydroelectricity in the world. With the demand for electricity, especially in the industrial sector, only expected to grow, Canada has some interesting ways with how it’s going to keep up with demand. Change in electrical infrastructure, generation and production are always subject to government changes, and what parts of the country are most and least in demand.

In terms of generation, according to the government of Canada, the country is expected to continue producing hydroelectricity at high levels but will see its share decrease from 55% to 51% of total production by the year 2040. Where the slack will be picked up is in wind generation, which is expected to rise from 7% of total electricity produced to 11% by 2040. We will also see a rise in production from biomass, solar, and geothermal, which will account for about 5% also by 2040. We will also see natural gas rise from 15% to 22% over that same time span. In terms of decreasing production, nuclear energy is expected to shrink down to about 6% from 10% by 2040.

On top of that, the country is linked to a number of exciting projects moving forward, including smart grids, small-scale renewable and clean energy products, and ecoEnergy. Diversification and a smaller reliance, if ever so slightly, on the types of energy Canada has always produced seem to be what’s going to be the norm in the coming decades.


Electrical Infrastructure and Civic Recycling

I guess this all begs the question of what does it all mean? Well, it’s important to know where Canada stands on energy as there are a great many jobs and investments that rely on what the future may hold. With climate change also becoming a greater concern, finding ways to combat its effects is an important discussion and process to begin. We also must ask; how does this impact us? As an electrical supplies company, we always need to know what comes next, whether that means changes in commercial or personal sales. The rules of the game are always changing and if you can’t keep up then you’ll get left behind.

At Civic Recycling we strive to be a part of Canada’s future energy goals while maintaining the things we do that we feel make us great. The world’s, and Canada’s, consumption of electricity and electrical infrastructure will change over the coming years and we plan on being right there with it.


 

Thanks for reading and we hope to chat with you soon.

Contact us here or learn more about how we test our electrical products, safety is our top priority. Civic Recycling is committed to delivering fantastics products to our customers across Canada.

Think of us for Electrical Equipment and breakers including:

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Find out Where Canadian Electricity Comes From

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Canadian Electricity? We are in fact big consumers of electrical power. In fact, when calculated per capita, we’re the fourth largest consumers of electricity in the entire world. Only Iceland, Finland and Norway use more electrical energy per person. And within this country, Albertans consume the second greatest amount of electricity of all the Provinces, second only to Saskatchewan. In total electric kilowatt per hour use per person in homes, however, Alberta comes in number one, at 15,334 kWh per person.

Where Does Canadian Electricity Come From?

The production of electricity is achieved through the turning of a turbine, which requires application of some type of mechanical energy. The energy used to turn the turbine can come from a variety of sources, including:

  • Coal
  • Hydro Electricity
  • Fossil fuels such as natural gas and oil
  • Wind Power
  • Solar Panels
  • Biomass/biogas
  • Nuclear (uranium), and more

Water is King for Most of Canadian Electricity

While Canada is a global leader in hydroelectric production, with nearly 60% of all our electricity coming from water turning those turbines, there’s still a lot of coal being burned to make power, at about 18% of the total. Burning natural gas and oil make up for about 8% of electrical generation nationwide, although in some Provinces, such as Ontario, they’re responsible for the creation of almost 25% of Canadian electricity being produced. This is slightly more than the 22% coming from hydro, but significantly less than the 32% total electricity coming from nuclear power plants in the Province.

Alberta’s Electricity Generation

As of late in 2014, homes, businesses and agricultural operations depended on Alberta’s near-14,600 megawatts (MW) of electrical generation capacity then currently installed. 78,000 MW of this generation capacity has been newly built since 1998. Much more is needed to keep up with the increasing demand.

This power is delivered through a system of approximately 24,000 km of installed transmission lines. About 43% of the electrical generation capacity in the Province comes from the burning of coal. Nearly 40% comes from the use of oil and gas. Because water isn’t nearly as plentiful in Alberta as it is in other locations, only a small amount of hydroelectric generation occurs here. Throughout Canada, different areas depend on difference energy resources to create the mechanical energy responsible for producing electricity. In some areas near the ocean even wave technology is being utilized.

Co-generation and the Environment

Co-generation makes up for almost 1/3 of Alberta’s electric generation capacity, which is both efficient and environmentally sound since the process produces substantially lower greenhouse gases. With co-generation, fuel such as gas or biomass is much more efficiently used since not only is electricity being generated but also heat and/or steam are byproducts that can be used for a variety of purposes, primarily industrial. Alternatively, waste heat generated through various industrial processes can be redeployed to produce electricity. This, too, is quite efficient since this heat would otherwise be wasted.

Other Energy Options in Alberta

The production of electrical energy is a vital service to all Albertans and electrical energy consumption is more common than any other type of energy use, not only on an individual, personal basis but also commercially, industrially and agriculturally. It’s also the most convenient form of energy to use as well as the quickest to deliver to the customer.

Alberta’s policy regarding electric micro-production allows individuals to create their own electricity, often in an environmentally friendly fashion, and even receive credit for any excess electricity produced and sent back to the existing power grid. Here at Civic Recycling we give a thumbs up to anything electric-related that benefits the environment, saves our customers money and makes life just a little bit better.

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June is National Electricity Month (Updated)

June is National Electricity Month Canada Civic Recyling Canadian Electricity Association

As the national voice of the electricity industry in Canada, the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) has designated June as National Electricity Month for the second consecutive year. In communities all across the country, CEA member utilities will be opening the doors of their facilities to the public, offering tours and answering questions about how the electricity system works.

Some of the electric utilities that have activities planned for National Electricity Month include:
• AltaLink
• BC Hydro and Power Authority
• Capital Power Corporation
• ENMAX Corporation
• FortisAlberta Inc.
• Manitoba Hydro
• Nalcor Energy
• New Brunswick Power Holding Company
• Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro
• Horizon Utilities Corporation
• Hydro Ottawa Holding Inc.
• Saint John Energy
• SaskPower
• Yukon Energy Corporation

June is National Electricity Month

For more on National Electricity month and a quick video visit this link: http://powerforthefuture.ca/national-electricity-month/

By allowing consumers to see how the system works first-hand, CEA hopes to foster a national conversation on the value of electricity, stimulating and informing the discussion about the choices that need to be made today if Canada is to maintain a reliable, affordable, and sustainable electricity grid.


 

Want to learn more about participating utilities?

http://powerforthefuture.ca/participating-utilities/


 

 

Looking to discover more about electricity across Canada? Utilize the information from Power For the Future and their “Virtual Open House” Feature page:

http://powerforthefuture.ca/virtual-open-house/


 

 

Tomorrow’s economy will be built on a solid foundation of clean, sustainable growth. Growth that will drive new technologies; increase productivity; and create jobs for Canadians. Growth that will be powered by safe, reliable, sustainable Canadian Electricity.

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