Electrical Safety: The Top 5 Points you Need to Know

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Civic Recycling offers new and reconditioned electrical equipment. Our certified technicians follow our rigorous testing standards on all reconditioned products. Safety is our top priority and so we have put together some information to keep you safe.

Electrical safety is critical both at home and at work. Here, we look at 5 top considerations to enhance your safety.

Electrical Safety: Use sockets with tamper-resistant (TR) receptacles

The National Electrical Code (NEC) requires that all buildings constructed or renovated after 2008 have tamper-resistant (TR) receptacles. TR receptacles are special devices with spring-loaded shutters that close off the contact openings of the receptacles. Because both springs need to be compressed before the shutters can open, electrocutions resulting from accidental insertion of a conducting material into one contact opening can be minimized.

Ensure that your home has ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs)

When there is a break in the grounding path of a low-resistance current, the current can take an alternative path to the ground through the user. This is called a ground fault. Ground faults are common and have resulted in severe injuries and even deaths in the past. Ground Fault Current Interrupters (GFCIs) are lightning-quick circuit breakers used to cut off such faults.

Protect your electrical outlets with Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs)

Replacement receptacles should be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protected. An AFCI is an electrical safety device that helps to prevent fires.  It resembles a GFCI in the sense that both devices have test buttons and a reset button. The main difference, however, is that GFCIs are designed to protect people from getting electrocuted whereas AFCIs are meant to prevent fires.

Be extra careful with transformers

Transformers must be carefully tested before installation and continuously monitored thereafter. Make sure that there is no continuity (electrical leakage) between the primary and secondary coil. Also, ensure that there is no leakage between the power cord and any metal external parts such as the rivets. Most transformers are equipped with circuit breakers for additional safety.

Use only tested devices that meet industry quality standards

The design and manufacture of electrical devices is guided by certain industry standards. The Canadian Electrical Code or CE code develops and maintains these standards. Our neighbours to the South follow the National Electric Code and the National Fire Protection Association. Electrical components that fail to meet these standards might expose you to unnecessary danger. Civic Recycling certifications meet and often exceed the standards set out by PEARL (Professional Electrical Apparatus Recyclers League), NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association), IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) and NETA (InterNational Electrical Testing Association).

All Civic Recycling electric devices; from circuit breakers to transformers, and fuses to motor controls, are tested to the highest standards to ensure that they are not only safe but very reliable.

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