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Civic Recycling – How Green Is The New Expert

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Being Green In the Electrical Industry

Recyclable material is a leading renewable energy resource. Initiatives taken to dismantle equipment and separate into appropriate parts not only aids in the production of low energy resources such as varying metals but also provides countless job opportunities. In Canada, research has shown that green/recycling industry accounts for 10 times more employment and revenue than the waste industry.

Recycling Programs in Alberta

Alberta has the honorable distinction of initiating Canada’s first electronics recycling program back in 2004 and Civic Recycling is proving themselves as being one of the leading companies to help the movement. Alberta alone has recycled well over 8 million pieces of electrical equipment which mean that our landfills have been saved from incredibly hazardous materials such as lead, mercury or cadmium found in circuit boards or cathode ray tubes.

Civic Recycling’s ongoing commitment to the environment, recycling and being a company to offer a full range of services within the electrical industry is clear in their 3 main strategies to properly dispose of hazardous equipment:

1. Fluorescent Ballast Recycling

Civic Recycling now accepts NON-PCB fluorescent ballasts. Your business will be provided with a Certificate of Recycling which can support various LEED programs within your industry.

2. Fluorescent Lamp Recycling

Did you know that a standard fluorescent lamp contains approximately 23mg of toxic mercury? That is enough mercury to contaminate 20,000 L of water! Civic Recycling’s on-site “55 VRSU Premium Bulb Eater” effectively removes over 98% of the mercury and phosphor dust contained in standard lamps.

3. Fluorescent Fixture Recycling

These fixtures pose many unique recycling problems which many landfills and metal recyclers do not accept because of their mix of metals and low-grade tin that makes the fixtures themselves and the ballast. Our unique approach of stripping down each component into separated smaller groups makes it easier for recyclers to process.

 


Civic Recycling loves being Green

For the past 20 years, Civic Recycling has been creatively seeking unique solutions for our valued customers.

Our passion and dedication in providing expert knowledge with our wide array of products from Circuit Breakers to Fuses fully translates our proficiency and environmental prowess with our recycling efforts.

Do not hesitate to contact us at anytime, talk soon and we hope you enjoyed reading!

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Find out Where Canadian Electricity Comes From

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Canadian Electricity? We are in fact big consumers of electrical power. In fact, when calculated per capita, we’re the fourth largest consumers of electricity in the entire world. Only Iceland, Finland and Norway use more electrical energy per person. And within this country, Albertans consume the second greatest amount of electricity of all the Provinces, second only to Saskatchewan. In total electric kilowatt per hour use per person in homes, however, Alberta comes in number one, at 15,334 kWh per person.

Where Does Canadian Electricity Come From?

The production of electricity is achieved through the turning of a turbine, which requires application of some type of mechanical energy. The energy used to turn the turbine can come from a variety of sources, including:

  • Coal
  • Hydro Electricity
  • Fossil fuels such as natural gas and oil
  • Wind Power
  • Solar Panels
  • Biomass/biogas
  • Nuclear (uranium), and more

Water is King for Most of Canadian Electricity

While Canada is a global leader in hydroelectric production, with nearly 60% of all our electricity coming from water turning those turbines, there’s still a lot of coal being burned to make power, at about 18% of the total. Burning natural gas and oil make up for about 8% of electrical generation nationwide, although in some Provinces, such as Ontario, they’re responsible for the creation of almost 25% of Canadian electricity being produced. This is slightly more than the 22% coming from hydro, but significantly less than the 32% total electricity coming from nuclear power plants in the Province.

Alberta’s Electricity Generation

As of late in 2014, homes, businesses and agricultural operations depended on Alberta’s near-14,600 megawatts (MW) of electrical generation capacity then currently installed. 78,000 MW of this generation capacity has been newly built since 1998. Much more is needed to keep up with the increasing demand.

This power is delivered through a system of approximately 24,000 km of installed transmission lines. About 43% of the electrical generation capacity in the Province comes from the burning of coal. Nearly 40% comes from the use of oil and gas. Because water isn’t nearly as plentiful in Alberta as it is in other locations, only a small amount of hydroelectric generation occurs here. Throughout Canada, different areas depend on difference energy resources to create the mechanical energy responsible for producing electricity. In some areas near the ocean even wave technology is being utilized.

Co-generation and the Environment

Co-generation makes up for almost 1/3 of Alberta’s electric generation capacity, which is both efficient and environmentally sound since the process produces substantially lower greenhouse gases. With co-generation, fuel such as gas or biomass is much more efficiently used since not only is electricity being generated but also heat and/or steam are byproducts that can be used for a variety of purposes, primarily industrial. Alternatively, waste heat generated through various industrial processes can be redeployed to produce electricity. This, too, is quite efficient since this heat would otherwise be wasted.

Other Energy Options in Alberta

The production of electrical energy is a vital service to all Albertans and electrical energy consumption is more common than any other type of energy use, not only on an individual, personal basis but also commercially, industrially and agriculturally. It’s also the most convenient form of energy to use as well as the quickest to deliver to the customer.

Alberta’s policy regarding electric micro-production allows individuals to create their own electricity, often in an environmentally friendly fashion, and even receive credit for any excess electricity produced and sent back to the existing power grid. Here at Civic Recycling we give a thumbs up to anything electric-related that benefits the environment, saves our customers money and makes life just a little bit better.

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